It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? 1/6/2020 #imwayr

Collage created using TurboCollage software from www.TurboCollage.com

Kellee Moye of Unleashing Readers and Jen Vincent of Teach Mentor Texts decided to give Kathryn’s (at Book Date) “It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?” meme a kidlit focus, reviewing books in children’s literature (picture books, chapter books, middle grade novels, young adult novels, or anything in the world of kidlit). If you enjoy this type of reading, join us every Monday to share what you’ve been reading!

Oh my, we’ve still been holiday-ing this week. I’m afraid it’s going to be difficult to get back into the groove. We’re hoping to take the tree down and put away all our holiday stuff TODAY. Maybe then we’ll feel like it’s truly over. LOL Thank you so very much for visiting, today!


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The Sad Little Fact
Jonah Winter
Pete Oswald, illustrator
May 7, 2019

While this is a picture book and intended for children, I think it would work better in the hands of tweens, teens, and adults. Because it would be a great way to introduce the study of information literacy as we peel back layers of “facts” to understand their origins and why some points are harder to believe than others. And yes, facts are not always facts. There are so many variables, which is a concept that is very difficult for a young child to comprehend. I also worry that a few things mentioned in this story were deliberate jabs at political and religious groups. They will not likely be well received by some parents. Otherwise, the artwork is really adorable and the book can open the floor for more detailed conversation. Why did the “Authorities” not believe certain facts? Why did they work so hard to bury them? On very thick paper, the illustrations were rendered digitally using gouache watercolor textures. I’ll provide one page spread as an example, below:

Sad-Fact-2-SPREAD

You can add it to your Goodreads list HERE.
If you do not have a local bookstore, you may purchase it through IndieBound HERE.
You may also choose to purchase it through Amazon HERE.


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The Little Red Stroller
Joshua Furst
Katy Wu, illustrator
April 16, 2019
Dial Books

In this story, the little red stroller is passed from family to family, traveling through many activities and diverse communities, until it faces its demise (after at least 10 families used it from babyhood through toddlerhood). But just when the last family discovers the red stroller is broken beyond repair, another family comes along and offers up their yellow stroller, since they no longer need it. In a cute ending, the yellow stroller somehow makes it back to the original owner of the red stroller, completing the cycle. Aside from the fact that very few strollers could make it through more than two or three families (especially families who spend so much time traveling and walking/jogging), it’s a cute story of community and recycling useful items. The art in this book was created digitally. I’ll provide one page spread as an example, below:

Red-Stroller-2-SPREAD

You can add it to your Goodreads list HERE.
If you do not have a local bookstore, you may purchase it through IndieBound HERE.
You may also choose to purchase it through Amazon HERE.


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Lubna and Pebble
Wendy Meddour
Daniel Egneus, illustrator
March 5, 2019
Dial Books

Beautiful artwork matches an emotional story as we witness a young girl named Lubna leaving home and living in a world of tents. Lubna’s best friend is a pebble that she talks to when she’s lonely or scared. One day she meets a young boy named Amir, and now has two friends. But what will happen when it’s time for the children to be separated? While the story doesn’t explicitly say so, it appears to be about the experience of young children in a refugee camp. This one will encourage much better understanding and empathy for the fear and alienation many children feel when they are driven from their home and lack connection. I’ll provide one page spread as an example of the artwork, below:

Lubna-SPREAD

You can add it to your Goodreads list HERE.
If you do not have a local bookstore, you may purchase it through IndieBound HERE.
You may also choose to purchase it through Amazon HERE.


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Another
Christian Robinson
March 5, 2019
Atheneum Books for Young Readers

I read this book long after my youngest went to sleep, which is such a shame. Because I believe we usually get more out of wordless picture books when we read them with children. Their perspectives and untainted imaginations are so fantastic to witness. But what I gathered from my reading of this story was the feeling of shifted reality. There are multiple perspectives mixed with pure imagination — and the cat leads the way for most of the story. The pictures made me think of a combination of Salvador Dali’s paintings mixed with Willie Wonka’s chocolate factory. And if my children ever happen to disappear into a mysterious hole in the wall, I sure hope they take a beloved pet along to guide them on their (safe!) journey back to reality. The illustrations for this book were rendered in paint and collage, with digital editing. I’ll provide one page spread as an example, below:

Another-SPREAD

You can add it to your Goodreads list HERE.
If you do not have a local bookstore, you may purchase it through IndieBound HERE.
You may also choose to purchase it through Amazon HERE.


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I Like My Bike
Antongionata Ferrari
January 15, 2019
Holiday House

This book is intended to be an easy reader with repetitive phrases that change just a word or two on each page. For example: “I like my bike. I like my car. I like my truck.” But there’s definitely more than words to this story, so kids will be giggling up a storm as they explore the page and discuss who is driving each mode of transportation. In fact, they might make a game out of where they can find the young girl riding her bike on every single page. With her striped shirt, this reminded me of Where’s Waldo? (Oh, and appears there’s more than just people and animals driving — do plants drive? LOL)

I actually just laughed when I finished this one and started over from the beginning to see what all I might have missed in the illustrations. The artwork in this book was created with black pencil, watercolors, india ink, collage, and digital tools. I’ll provide one page spread as an example, below:

Like-Bike-SPREAD

You can add it to your Goodreads list HERE.
If you do not have a local bookstore, you may purchase it through IndieBound HERE.
You may also choose to purchase it through Amazon HERE.


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Chicken Talk
Patricia MacLachlan
Jarrett J. Krosoczka, illustrator
January 15, 2019
Katherine Tegen Books

At Willie and Belle’s farm there are 11 hens named Trixie, Grace, Bitsy, Boo, Joyce, Joyce, Joyce, Joyce, Joyce, Joyce, and Joyce. That’s right, there are seven Joyces (because they cannot tell any of them apart). Additionally, there’s one protective rooster named Pedro. A mystery is brewing as the family wakes up to messages scratched in the dirt each day, but no one knows who is writing them. The chickens don’t want salad, the mailman drives too fast, the Joyces each want their own names, and it’s too hot in the henhouse. But keep guessing throughout this story because you won’t find out who-done-it until the very last page! 🙂 I’ll provide just one page spread as an example of the artwork, below:

Chicken-Talk-SPREAD

You can add it to your Goodreads list HERE.
If you do not have a local bookstore, you may purchase it through IndieBound HERE.
You may also choose to purchase it through Amazon HERE.


To Be Read:

I’m still reading an ARC of Farah Rocks Fifth Grade by Susan Muaddi Darraj and illustrated by Ruaida Mannaa, which is great so far! I’m also listening to Song of the Crimson Flower by Julie C. Dao and I am expecting Sulwe by Lupita Nyong’o and illustrated by Vashti Harrison will arrive this week!

Collage created using TurboCollage software from www.TurboCollage.com


Reading Challenge Updates: 

Goodreads Challenge 2020 – 10/200
#MustReadin2020 – *still working on this list*


9 thoughts on “It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? 1/6/2020 #imwayr

  1. I’ll look for The Little Red Stroller. What a nice story to have for those who have passed the strollers on. I loved Lubna & Pebble, a unique story! Will put others on my list, Shaye. I did put away most of my Christmas things Sunday, but of course, found a few things forgotten! Happy New Year!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m sure we’ll be finding odds and ends for the next couple months. In fact, we found a stocking hidden in one of the kid’s closets before Christmas this year. LOL Thanks for visiting, Linda!

      Like

  2. I really enjoyed Lubna and Pebble, too! I thought it was just beautiful! I’ll definitely have to check out the other books on your list. Now that the holidays are over, it’s time to get back to my reading! Thanks for sharing and have a terrific week!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I hope things start falling back into place for me as we get the last of our Christmas packed up. It’s been so hard to find “me” time with all the hustle going on. But I also am glad for family time!! Thanks for visiting, Jana!

      Like

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